IMPACT 18 – Matter in Movement
Participants share their impressions


by PACT

Kategorie
Dokumentation

Kendra Krueger & Valentine Tanz

Valentine Tanz
© Photo: Dirk Rose

What is your profession? What are you dealing with thematically? How do the IMPACT18 topics relate to your work?

My name is Kendra Krueger. I am an intersectional scientist. I use many different methodologies and philosophies to promote the idea that science can be a tool of liberation, a practice where we can explore not only the external world, but our internal world simultaneously. Right now, I work mainly in New York City. I am an educator in many formats – right now I am at the City University of New York, where I am a science educator. I help to run the educational youth programs, and also to train scientists, engineers, and researchers at the university in how to communicate their research with youth and to the public in general. And also in how to understand their research in a more socially conscious way.

Can you describe in a few words your impression of IMPACT18?

There were so many conversations that were interesting, inspiring, full of levity, joy and laughter, full of validation in so many ways. Conversations around how we use our practice as tools of changing the world, of exploring concepts for multiple contexts. That seemed to be a big theme: how do we take these ideas that are in one context, and tell the story from a different background, from a different angle – and to really do so with bravery and courage in a way that really is pushing boundaries. To inspire others and the rest of the world to consider new ways of thinking in general. 

What experiences are you taking home?

One of the things that I’m taking away from this space is a real sense of validation, that it is not just me in the world, who is thinking in this way and the dream now, or the thinking ahead to the future and knowing now that I have a community to tap into and collaborators, places to travel, people to check in with, even just in an emotional sense. A real emotional connection was built with the people here, and the space even, with the city, with the level of resources and to know that this kind of work and this kind of resources are being supported and allowed to flourish in a place with love. And that love can be cultivated in these kinds of spaces, with these kinds of ideas, is revolutionary.

Kendra Krueger is an intersectional scientist based in New York, As founder, artist, facilitator, educator at 4LoveandScience, her research is both theoretical and experimental. The experimental work consists of developing intuitive technology that is based on indigenous or ancient wisdom. A large part of her work is motivated by the intention to heal - heal communities from social trauma, heal ourselves from generational trauma.

What is your profession? What are you dealing with thematically? How do the IMPACT18 topics relate to your work?

My name is Valentine Tanz, which is my artist’s name. My background is in choreography and poetry – I see poetic imagination as a source for my choreographic work. In Poland, I experienced the impact of an extremely right wing government. For me this lead to the conviction that my art has to serve democracy and ultimately, I ran a campaign to become the mayor of Krakow. As a result, I received multiple death threats. In my Master degree, my teacher was the choreographer Anna Halprin, now 98 years old. She’s been mentoring me since almost ten years – her teaching was a big revelation to me. I understood how dance is a very personal thing, yet it becomes very political and stands for freedom. My art definitely is a movement for freedom, which often shakes and confronts taboos related to sexuality, fascism or exclusion. I have lost myhome, I have lost my art space, and my job when I gave up my identity. What has stayed is my body. 

Can you describe in a few words your impression of IMPACT18? What issues or experiences are you taking home?

Well, I came here because of my interest in certain topics that we were discussing in this community of people. But to be frankly honest, first of all, it has been a very nourishing time: my everyday life is full of threats and being here and being able to be myself, and being offered safety and recognition in the framework of IMPACT has been very important for me. Meeting like-minded people, who care for this world and have no fear of addressing topics like colonization and power structures and who work for a better future, was definitely very crucial for me. It helps me not to loose hope in my career and practice. Definitely, it was very important to be here.

Valentine Tanz is a choreographer, performance maker and curator with an anthropological background based in Krakow, who has been initiating a number of community projects, festivals and workshops with local LGTBQI+ scenes in Poland and internationally within the field of performing arts. Vala Tomasz Foltyn is the first transgender candidate for the office of the President of Krakow.

Bengü Özakıncı

Bengü Özakıncı
© Photo: Dirk Rose

What is your profession? What are you dealing with thematically? How do the IMPACT18 topics relate to your work?

I am a media arts researcher, artist and occasionally curator. My research traces changing forms of critical media practices and I am interested in identifying artistic practices that use novel technologies while responding to fluid political landscapes. 

In this context I have been looking into critical media practices that incorporate blockchain technology in my master thesis. During IMPACT18, we discussed a lot about technologies and protocols in their entanglements in socio-politics. We had a lecture on blockchain, decentralization and technology development. This topics and contexts were in parallel to my research.   

Bengü Özakıncı is an artist and researcher based in Istanbul. She researches on critical artistic and media practices that incorporate blockchain technology, with a special interest in the protocological logic of the blockchain and its entanglement in politics. She works on identifying artistic practices that use novel technologies while responding to fluid political landscapes.

Can you describe in a few words your impression of IMPACT18? What issues or experiences are you taking home?

IMPACT is a stimulating, engaging and facilitating platform where people from many unique disciplines and passions come together to discuss pressing issues of our times. As much as we learnt about new topics and gained in-depth insights into topics central to digital culture, the workshop facilitators led us to put forward our own perspectives on control, surveillance and the ubiquity of them. In this sense, IMPACT was an intriguing invitation to keep learning and sharing with others. Moreover, the open and welcoming workshop structures generated freedom, alliances and solidarity. 

Swati Piparsania

Swati Piparsania
Dirk Rose

Swati Piparsania is a researcher and designer based in Brooklyn. Currently she is a AICAD Teaching Fellow at Pratt Institute in New York City, instructing Experimental Industrial Design. Her research investigates predicted displacement and capitalized navigation. She uses design for a passive rebellion, searching for politically charged bodies and their (dis-)placements while people go to work and come home for dinner.

Can you describe in a few words your impression of IMPACT18? What issues or experiences are you taking home?

PACT's initiative to bring international artists together is very strong. Beyond meeting and living together for a set number of days I personally enjoyed talking about my research and artistic practice with experienced professionals of this field. Learning to communicate and differentiate subjects of thought is something I hold dearly. And being a part of this historic place while contemplating contemporary issues in itself is a bliss to live in. Very IMPACTful. 

IMPACT18 - Matter in Movement